Homemade 24-Hour Beef Stock


Yield: 4 Quarts

Feel free to change out the vegetable ingredients based on what’s available in your fridge, but steer clear of broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, they will cause stock to taste bitter. Also avoid red beets, which will color the stock blood red!

Ingredients:
2 lbs. meaty beef bones*
2 lbs. beef bone marrow and/or knuckle bones **
6 quarts cold filtered water (24 cups)
2 tbsp unfiltered apple cider vinegar
1 tsp sea salt
1 tsp fresh cracked black pepper
3 large carrots, scrubbed, top & bottom trimmed, and cut into 2-inch pieces (approx 2 cups)
3 stalks celery with leaves, cleaned and cut into 2-inch pieces (approx 3 cups)
2 fresh or dried bay leaves
10 whole black peppercorns
1 large onion, peeled and quartered
2 whole garlic cloves, unpeeled
8 sprigs parsley

Instructions:
Preheat oven to 400˚.  In a large pot, combine bone marrow and/or knucklebones, water and apple cider vinegar.  Allow bones to soak in the vinegar, which draws out additional calcium from the bones.

Arrange meaty beef bones on a sheet pan.  Sprinkle all sides evenly with 1 tsp sea salt and 1 tsp pepper.  Roast for 40 – 60 minutes in the pre-heated 400˚ oven to achieve a roasted brown exterior on the meat. Cooking time depends upon the cut of meat.  Oxtails will cook more quickly. Roasting the meat adds a beautiful brown color and rich meaty flavor to the stock.

While bones are browning, combine the carrots, celery, bay leaves, peppercorns, onion and garlic in a medium bowl and set aside.  Reserve parsley for the last 10 minutes of cooking. When bones have browned, remove them from the oven and using tongs, add them to the vinegar-water.  Bring water to a boil over high heat, uncovered.  If a foamy scum develops on the surface of the stock once a rolling boil is reached, skim and discard with a large flat spoon.  After skimming, add prepared vegetables.

Cover, reduce heat to low and maintain a gentle simmer for 4-24 hours.  Adjust heat up or down to maintain the gentle simmer.  If you have time for a 24-hour stock, occasionally check the stock and add additional water, if necessary.  A long cooking time allows more digestion-enhancing gelatin to be released from the bones into the stock and enhances its flavor.

Ten minutes before removing stock from the heat, add parsley.  Remove stock from heat and cool uncovered for 10 minutes.  Using a pair of tongs remove large bones and discard.  Strain stock using a chinois or large strainer. (See Note.)  Discard vegetables and remaining meaty bones, or reserve vegetables to feed an animal.  (Meat may also be reserved for an animal, but discard bones, which haven’t been properly treated and may splinter.) Stock may be used immediately.  However when fully cooled in the refrigerator, fat may rise to the surface.  Use a spoon to scoop off the fat and discard before use.  This step allows the cook to control the amount of fat in a dish.

Store stock in a glass container for up to 3 days.  Stocks may be stored in the freezer for several months.  I store my stock in a quart-size glass mason jar.  Make sure to allow 3” of room in the jar for the liquid to expand in the freezer.  Resist boiling the jar in a pot of water to thaw; the glass jar may break.  Defrost on the counter, in the fridge or in a pinch, under warm running water.

* Both ox tails and short ribs are excellent choices of meaty beef bones.

** Many grocery stores already have knuckle and marrowbones packaged in the freezer section for purchase.  If not, ask a favorite butcher to save them for you.  However, I would suggest seeking out a grass-fed farmer from a local farmers’ market.  It will be a much more inexpensive option, possibly even free!

Note:
A Chinois is a piece of kitchen equipment that is a cone-shaped fine mesh strainer with a long handle.  To strain stock using this helpful kitchen tool, rest the Chinois over a pot or bowl.  After removing the large meaty bones pieces, pour the stock & vegetables down through the center of the Chinois.  Lift the Chinois from the pot or bowl, allowing the liquid to drain off.  Discard or reuse the vegetables.  Due to the fine mesh, the remaining stock is perfectly strained, leaving a beautiful clear broth.  If a Chinois is not an option, set a large kitchen strainer into a larger pot or bowl.  After removing the large bones, pour the stock & vegetables down through the center of the strainer.  Lift the strainer from the pot or bowl leaving the stock behind.  Since a common kitchen strainer has larger holes than a Chinois, the stock may not be purely filtered.  It will still taste delicious and many recipes do not require a perfectly clear broth. If a more clear result is desired after straining the stock once, line the same kitchen strainer with a triple layer of cheesecloth.  Be sure the edges of the cheesecloth drape generously over the sides and the center of the cheesecloth touches the entire bowl of the strainer.  Clothespins or potato chip clips can be used to secure the cheesecloth to the rim.  Set the strainer inside a larger pot or bowl.  Pour the stock through the strainer again.  Lift the strainer from the pot or bowl.  Discard the cheesecloth.  The resulting stock will be perfectly strained.

Healing Soup


Ingredients:
1 tbsp unrefined coconut oil
2 cups diced yellow onion (approx 1 medium)
1 tbsp minced garlic (approx 3 cloves)
1 cup chopped asparagus (approx 1 bunch)
2 cups spinach leaves
3 cups chopped broccoli (approx 1 large head) *
¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
2 tsp sea salt
½ tsp fresh cracked black pepper
6 cups homemade chicken stock

Instructions:
In a large heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat, warm coconut oil until glistening.  Add onion and saute for 5 minutes, stirring frequently; onions will have softened.  Add garlic and saute for 1 minute, stirring constantly; garlic will be fragrant. Add asparagus, broccoli, red pepper, sea salt, black pepper and chicken stock. Bring to a boil, cover and reduce to a simmer. Simmer for 20 minutes. Turn burner off. Add spinach, stir and allow to cool for 5 minutes. Puree the soup in a blender in small batches OR use a puree stick to blend.

* Both the florets and the stalk of the broccoli may be used.  Simply cut off the bottom 1″ of the stock and peel the outer layer with a vegetable peeler.  Chop and add to the soup with the florets.

Homemade 24-Hour Chicken Stock


With a good stock, soups are nearly complete! Feel free to change out the vegetables based on what’s available in your fridge, but steer clear of broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, they will cause stock to taste bitter. Always bring a stock to a boil uncovered to allow any impurities in the ingredients to foam to the surface. After skimming the foam with a large, flat spoon, stock can be covered for the remaining simmer, which retains moisture and allows the stock to bubble away for hours without the fear of running out of water. For more detailed information on the wonders of bone broths, I suggest the book Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon.

Ingredients:
5 quarts (20 cups) cold filtered water
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 lbs. bone-in chicken *
3 large carrots, scrubbed, top & bottom trimmed and cut into 2-inch pieces (approx 2 cups)
3 stalks celery, leaves attached, cleaned and cut into 2-inch pieces (approx 3 cups)
2 fresh or dried bay leaves
10 whole black peppercorns
1 large onion, peeled & quartered
2 garlic cloves, whole & unpeeled
8 sprigs parsley

Instructions:
In a large pot, combine water, apple cider vinegar and chicken. Allow chicken to soak in the vinegar-water for 1 hour, drawing additional calcium out of the bones.  In the meantime, combine carrots, celery, bay leaves, black peppercorns, onion & garlic in a small bowl and set aside. Reserve parsley for the last 10 minutes of cooking. After 1 hour, bring chicken bones and water to a boil over high heat, uncovered. If a foamy scum develops on the surface of the stock once a rolling boil is reached, skim and discard with a large flat spoon. After skimming, add prepared vegetables.

Cover, reduce heat to low and maintain a gentle simmer for 2-24 hours. Adjust heat up or down to maintain the gentle simmer. If you have time for a 24-hour stock, occasionally check the stock and add additional water, if necessary. A long cooking time allows more digestion-enhancing gelatin to be released from the bones into the stock and enhances the flavor.

Ten minutes before removing the stock from the heat, add parsley. Remove stock from heat and cool uncovered for 10 minutes. Using a pair of tongs, transfer chicken pieces to cool on a large plate. Once cool, debone and re-use meat as needed. Strain stock using a chinois or large strainer. (See Note.) Discard vegetables or reserve to feed an animal. Stock may be used immediately. However when fully cooled in the refrigerator, fat may rise to the surface. Use a spoon to scoop off the fat and discard before use. This step allows the cook to control the amount of fat in a dish.

Store stock in a glass container for up to 3 days. Stocks may be stored in the freezer for several months. I store my stock in a quart-size glass mason jar. Make sure to allow 3″ of room in the jar for the liquid to expand in the freezer. Resist boiling the jar in a pot of water to thaw; the glass jar may break. Defrost on the counter, in the fridge or in a pinch, under warm running water.

* Any combination of chicken pieces will do. I often use 2 bone-in thighs with several inexpensive wings to reach a total of 2 lbs. I also save the backs in my freezer from when I butterfly or breakdown a chicken, until I have enough to make stock.  Also I suggest visiting a chicken farmer at a local farmers’ market, I am able to purchase “soup kits,” which contain backs, necks, feet, wings and sometimes even heads!  Sounds gross, but feet and heads provide so much health supportive gelatin for our joints.

Note: A Chinois is a piece of kitchen equipment that looks like a cone-shaped very fine mesh strainer with a long handle. To strain stock using this helpful kitchen tool, rest the Chinois over a pot or bowl. After removing the chicken pieces, poor the stock & vegetables down through the center of the Chinois. Lift the Chinois from the pot or bowl, allowing the liquid to drain off. Discard or reuse the vegetables. Due to the fine mesh, the remaining stock is perfectly strained, leaving a beautiful clear stock. If a Chinois is not an option, set a large kitchen strainer into a larger pot or bowl. After removing the chicken pieces, pour the stock & vegetables down through the center of the strainer. Lift the strainer from the pot or bowl leaving the stock behind. Since a common kitchen strainer has larger holes than a Chinois, the stock may not be purely filtered. It will still taste delicious and many recipes do not require a perfectly clear broth. If a more clear result is desired after straining the stock once, line the same kitchen strainer with a triple layer of cheesecloth. Be sure the edges of the cheesecloth drape generously over the sides and the center of the cheesecloth touches the entire bowl of the strainer. Use clothespins or potato chip clips to secure the cheesecloth to the rim. Set the strainer inside a larger pot or bowl. Pour the stock through the strainer again. Lift the strainer from the pot or bowl. Discard the cheesecloth. The resulting stock will be perfectly strained.

Carrot Ginger Soup with Coconut Milk


Serves 4 – 6

Ingredients:
1 tbsp ghee, coconut oil or butter
1 cup diced yellow onions
1 tbsp minced garlic (approx 3 cloves)
1 tbsp minced ginger
5 cups homemade chicken stock
7 cups 1/2″ sliced classic orange carrots
1 1/2 tsp sea salt, plus more to taste
1/2 cup organic coconut milk (full fat)

Instructions:
In a large soup pot over medium heat, melt ghee until glistening. Add onions and saute for 5 minutes; onions will have softened. Add ginger and garlic and saute for 1 minute; garlic will be fragrant. Add chicken stock, carrots and sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Turn off heat and remove lid. Allow soup to cool for 10 minutes. Puree in batches in the blender. Make sure to cover the lid of the blender with a tea towel before turning it on to avoid hot liquid splattering out of the top. (A puree stick may be used instead of a blender, but I prefer the creamy texture of a blender for this soup.) Rinse the soup pot and return liquid to the pot. Stir in coconut milk. Taste and re-season with sea salt, if necessary.

Serve warm, and enjoy!